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Why and how does CROP ROTATION work?

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"Crop rotation is the practice of growing a series of dissimilar or different types of crops in the same area in sequenced seasons. It is done so that the soil of farms is not used for only one set of nutrients. It helps in reducing soil erosion and increases soil fertility and crop yield.

Growing the same crop in the same place for many years in a row (Monoculture) disproportionately depletes the soil of certain nutrients. With rotation, a crop that leaches the soil of one kind of nutrient is followed during the next growing season by a dissimilar crop that returns that nutrient to the soil or draws a different ratio of nutrients. In addition, crop rotation mitigates the buildup of pathogens and pests that often occurs when one species is continuously cropped, and can also improve soil structure and fertility by increasing biomass from varied root structures." -source



What are the benefits of practicing good crop rotation? 

1. Soil Improvement - By rotating your crops every year you'll naturally restore the health of your soil after each season. 

2. Pest Control - Pests and disease can live in your soil for years, so by rotating what you're growing in a specific area every year, you'll dramatically reduce the amount of whatever ailments are living and breeding in your soil. 

3. Weed Management - Weeds can have a negative impact on your crops because they are depleting the soil of nutrients that your plants need to thrive and produce. Cover crops are an excellent way to help smother any weeds that might pop up. 

4. Increased Yields & Productivitiy -  Increased yields are attributed often through improved soil nutrition, which is a direct result of praciting good crop rotation.

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